Session Schedule

Monday, October 17, 2022

9:00-9:30                    Announcements and Welcome-Mobile Convention Center West Ballroom

9:30-10:30                  Keynote-Mobile Convention Center West Ballroom

 

Keynote: All Belong. All Learn. All Succeed.

Lee Ann Jung, PhD

This opening keynote will engage the audience in thinking about the false dichotomy of developmental delay versus typical development. Through this lens, we will consider the most important keys to success so all children belong, all learn, and all succeed.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe cognitive shift with regards to the false dichotomy of disability and its impact on instruction and intervention decisions.
  2. Describe and provide analogies to help others understand the concept of universal design for learning.
  3. Describe and provide examples of strategies within the three principles of universal design for learning.
10:30-11:00                Break and Exhibitors

11:00-12:00                Breakout Sessions-Renaissance Riverview Hotel

Transition from Early Intervention to School Without Tears-For Adults

Susan Bunyard, MS, CCC-SLP and Monya Peppers, MS, CCC-SLP

This session is an overview of transition from Early Intervention to school-based services. Strategies will be provided to improve understanding of the process of eligibility and Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) to lead to more effective outcomes.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the referral process to school systems to parents in ways that engage them as the driving stake holders.
  2. Describe the scope and sequence of the process to include forms that parents will see in the transition to school process.
  3. Explain the need for data at the referral meeting and parent input that is critical for eligibility as well as driving the IEP when one is appropriate.
  4. Coach parents to higher levels of confidence when dealing with the transition process from Early Intervention to the child’s neighborhood school.
  5. Describe current forms used for referral and IEP that are used by Alabama State Department of Education as of 2022 and how to access these forms.

Learning Through Their Lens: Collaborating with Families from Diverse Backgrounds

Kimberly Hile, PhD

This session will challenge participants to examine their perceptions and potential biases (either explicit or implicit) related to families with different backgrounds or experiences than their own (teen parents, LGBTQ+, homeless, undocumented, substance abuse, incarceration, mental health, etc.). Participants will develop an understanding of how these experiences may impact family functioning as well as their ability to build effective partnerships with them. Professionals can expect to walk away with a deeper understanding of themselves, the strengths present in all families, and strategies to use when challenges arise.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Summarize perceptions about families representing diverse backgrounds.
  2. Describe how diverse backgrounds may impact family functioning as well as their ability to build effective partnerships with them.
  3. Describe strategies and resources for building effective partnerships with ALL families.

Screening Initiatives and Providing Autism Evaluations to Alabama’s Youngest Population (Under Age Three): A Children’s Rehabilitation Services and Early Intervention Partnership

Sonia Cleckler, SLP; Ashley Evans, MD; Billy Ronilo, MS, PT; and Mary Beth Vick, MA

This session will describe findings from a Part C Early Intervention (EI) Autism Screening Pilot initiative which began in 2021 with four EI Programs in the state. At each EI program a Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers, Revised (M-CHAT-R) screener is completed on all children referred to EI between the ages of 18-30 months and for the children whose M-CHAT scores meets criteria for an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnostic recommendation, a “priority referral” is made. Due to the number of children with high M-CHAT scores, EI and Children’s Rehabilitation Services (CRS) joined forces to pilot a CRS clinic in Tuscaloosa, AL where EI “priority referrals” are assigned. This partnership will be discussed as well as what the next steps are for other CRS sites to provide ASD diagnostics for children in EI. 

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Screening Pilot Initiative.
  2. Describe the Children’s Rehabilitation Services ASD Diagnostic Clinic pilot.
  3. Summarize the next steps for ASD screening and diagnostics for the youngest population of Alabama.

Language Acquisition through Motor Planning (LAMP) Principles and Practice for Early Intervention

Melissa Pouncey, MS, CCC-SLP

This session will familiarize participants with Language Acquisition through Motor Planning (LAMP) principles and apply them to Early Intervention practice. It does not qualify as an official LAMP training, but will give participants therapeutic principles that can be used in both language and social based therapy for individuals with early Autism “red flags”.

Participants will be able to:

  1. List the 5 principles of LAMP.
  2. Describe how to pair teaching strategies with LAMP principles.
  3. Describe the barriers to typical language development in children with Autism.
  4. List strategies for increasing joint attention in interactions using AAC.
  5. Describe sensory interventions to increase readiness to learn.

Toe Walking: Causes and Intervention Strategies

Lisa Steed, PT and Corinne Chapman, MSPT*

Toe walking in the 0-3 population can have many causes which determine the need for intervention or observation. We will describe possible causes and provide ideas for intervention strategies.  We will include algorithms for determining the level of intervention needed based on research and personal experiences.

Participants will be able to:

  1. List causes for toe walking in the 0-3 population and indications for referral to medical community.
  2. Summarize strategies for treating toe walking in the natural environment.
  3. Describe indications for more aggressive treatments such as serial casting or orthotics to impact improved gait in early toe walkers.

*PTs will present live via Zoom with in-person facilitator

How is Your Engine Running?

Amy Brakenhoff

Do you sometimes wonder, “What is revving my engine in the classroom/workplace?” Or, “What is their behavior trying to tell me?”  If so, then this session is for you. We’ll look at what we spend our time on in the classroom, we’ll dive into behaviors and what they are telling us, and practice strategies to implement after identifying what the behavior displayed is seeking.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the three basic brain states.
  2. Describe what each brain state is seeking.
  3. Identify one strategy to try in their classroom immediately.
12:00-1:30                  Lunch Break

1:30-3:00                    Breakout Sessions- Renaissance Riverview Hotel

Early Childhood Programs Supported by Alabama’s Department of Human Resources (DHR)

 Candice Keller, MPA

This session will help participants learn about early childhood programs and resources supported by the Alabama Department of Human Resources to promote high quality educational experiences.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe different resources supported by DHR to promote high quality experiences.
  2. List  available funding supports to create high quality educational programs.
  3. Explain the services DHR provides to the child care community.

Sweet Child of Mind: Behavioral and Therapeutic Strategies When You Have Nothing at Your Disposal

 Shauna Ashley, MAT, MS, CCC-SLP; Danielle Rich, PhD, CCC-SLP; and Stephanie Collum, MS, CCC-SLP

This session will provide behavioral strategies to help you deal with problem behaviors and teach new skills. We will also learn how to teach those new skills with little to no materials- using only what is already in the home and available to the child. We will be able to understand the cultural implications of poverty and how it relates to skill development in children.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Summarize differences between typical (eg. temper tantrum) and atypical (eg. overstimulation, meltdown) behaviors.
  2. Identify the culture (eg. poverty) of the family to determine the types of strategies that can be used to target typical and atypical behaviors.
  3. Describe techniques to handle unwanted behaviors.

Architects and Builders

Lee Ann Jung, PhD

From the special instructor or special education teacher, to a childcare provider, early education teacher, or family–What are everyone’s roles on an intervention team? Come to this interactive session for an exploration of roles, identities, and discussion of how to make decisions about frequency of services and what everyone does. You may even get to play with Legos!

Participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the roles special instructors, special education teachers, childcare providers, early education teachers, and families each play in the design and implementation of interventions.
  2. Apply strategies to make decisions about frequency and intensity of services on an IEP or IFSP based on what adults and children need.
  3. Summarize the differences between an intervention and a service.

Feeding Basics/Picky Eaters

Mary Collins, MS, CCC-SLP

This session will discuss types of picky eating, the whys behind picky eating, and strategies to introduce new foods. The differences between the typical picky eating phase and when there is an underlying cause will also be discussed.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the ‘why’ behind picky eating.
  2. Assess what is a typical picky eating phase and what has an underlying cause.
  3. Decide which strategies to use for varying reasons behind picky eating.

Using the Hammersmith Infant Neurological Examination to Identify Children At-Risk for Cerebral Palsy

Sheree York, PT, DPT, PCS

The Hammersmith Infant Neurological Examination (HINE) is a tool to identify young children at-risk for cerebral palsy. The HINE Clinical Exam includes tests of Function of the Cranial Nerves, Posture, Movements, Tone, Reflexes and Reactions, and Behavior. The results of the examination identify those who would benefit from early intervention and therapy services.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the need to identify infants and young children who are at-risk for cerebral palsy.
  2. Demonstrate how to administer the Hammersmith Infant Neurological Examination.
  3. Explain results of the HINE with parents and physicians.

It’s All About the Process: Developmentally Appropriate Art for All Ages

Rebecca Duke, PhD and Amber Hauberg, MS

In this hands-on training, participants will learn the importance of process art – an open-ended art experience where the child is in control. Explore the benefits of process art (vs. project-based art) and discover how it can benefit all areas of the developmental domains.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the difference between process art and project oriented art.
  2. Explain the importance of process art in the early childhood classroom.
  3. Summarize how processed art can encourage and enhance language acquisition.
  4. List developmentally appropriate techniques for process art.
  5. Demonstrate methods for artistic inclusion.
3:00-3:15                    Break and Exhibitors

3:15-4:45                    Breakout Sessions- Renaissance Riverview Hotel

Advancement and Lessons Learned: Findings and Shared Experiences from the Alabama Part C Autism Initiative

Angie Barber, PhD; Neeta Baughn; and Kendall Hampton

A panel of state leaders and Early Intervention providers (Autism mentors) will discuss five Autism Spectrum Disorder strategies of intervention for children and families in Early Intervention. Mentors will also share lessons learned and suggestions for home visiting, preschool teams, and Speech-Language Pathologists.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe new findings in autism and early communication development.
  2. Describe strategies to use with children with autism, their families and interventionists, with an emphasis on social communication and language.
  3. Apply strategies with children on their caseloads and in their classrooms.

Increasing Young Children’s Emotional IQ

Jamie Hill, LPC, NCC, ECMH-E

As young children develop their social-emotional skills, they sometimes struggle to express themselves. This session will teach providers and caregivers how to help children learn about the big world of feelings.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe emotional intelligence and how it develops.
  2. Explain the role of caregivers in developing emotional intelligence.
  3. Describe and demonstrate strategies for increasing emotional intelligence in young children.

Fathers’ Perspectives and Supports

David Barry, Horace Jackson, Tristan Johnson, and Jonathan Hornsby

Fathers will share their perspectives on how they have been able to navigate through life experiences. Various types of supports for fathers that can be implemented by Early Intervention programs will be presented.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe importance of providing support to fathers who typically do not open up.
  2. List how fathers can provide resources to other dads.
  3. Summarize how to begin a fathers’ group.
  4. List the objectives of having a fathers’ group.
  5. Explain the benefits of having a fathers’ group.

Safety in the Field

 Johnny Lee

This session will provide simple, direct tips and habits to promote the safety for all of those who work in Early Intervention, home visitation, and child care settings. Topics include: safety for home/daycare visiting; preparation; getting there; being there; leaving; reporting red flags and precautions; what to look for in and out of the home; high risk situations; and how to recognize and communicate with a domestic violence victim and refer and support them. NOTE: The same session will be presented on both Monday and Tuesday so additional participants can attend.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Summarize how to prepare for an off-site visit to reduce safety risks.
  2. Describe how to travel with increased security awareness.
  3. Identify warning signs at the site location and position yourself for maximum safety.
  4. Describe how to leave home or daycare visits safely.
  5. List how to document safety concerns.

 Review of the Updated CDC Guidelines for Child Development

 Sheree York, PT, DPT, PCS; Jenna Weinrich, MS, CCC-SLP; Kayla Kinzer, MCD, CCC-SLP; and Sandee Coker, OTD, OT/L

An expert working group revised the developmental surveillance checklists to clarify when most children (>75%) can be expected to reach developmental milestone. This working group sought to improve the use of developmental screening at recommended ages. This session will discuss the updates to these milestones across the four developmental domains of social-emotional, language/communications, cognitive, and motor skills.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Summarize the new CDC guideline for gross motor, fine motor, and speech and language development.
  2. Compare the new and old guidelines to recognize updated information.
  3. Describe how the new guidelines affect our professions.
  4. Explain how the new guidelines may impact referrals from medical professionals.

Back to Basics: Tips for Working with Late Talkers

Tracy Martin, MS, CCC-SLP; Kelli Rigney-Wolfe, MS, CCC-SLP; and Rachel Lunsford, MS, CCC-SLP

This presentation will define and discuss risk factors, signs, and symptoms of late language emergence. Components of language assessments, as well as foundational skills which need to be assessed when working with late talkers will be addressed. Procedures for assessing these skills and practical tips for therapy with late talkers will be provided.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define and describe late language emergence.
  2. List several risk factors, signs, and symptoms for late language emergence.
  3. Explain components of a language assessment.
  4. Identify and describe pre-linguistic foundational skills and ways to address these skills in therapy.
  5. Name ways to address receptive language skills in therapy.

Tuesday, October 18, 2022

9:00-9:30                    Announcements -Mobile Convention Center West Ballroom

9:30-10:30                  Keynote-Mobile Convention Center West Ballroom

Keynote: Ain’t That Amazing and Other Sayings I’ve Used to Run the Race from Early Intervention to Graduation and Beyond

Deborah Owens

This keynote is designed to share through humor the presenter’s experiences navigating doctors, therapists, milestones, and life as a parent of a child needing to access services and acceptance from birth to 24.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the changing dynamics of a family when a child is diagnosed with a disability.
  2. Identify successful strategies to engage parents and families while providing services as the dynamics of a family shift when a child receives a disability diagnosis.
  3. Summarize how acceptance, understanding, laughter, and patience serve to remove barriers.
10:30-11:00                Break and Exhibitors

11:00-12:00                Breakout Sessions-Renaissance Riverview Hotel

Equipping Families to Prevent Child Abuse and Neglect

Stephanie Wright, RN

This session will discuss the importance of equipping families with protective factors which research has shown to strengthen families and decrease the risk of child abuse and neglect. Participants will also learn the harmful effects of Abusive Head Trauma.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Identify protective factors for preventing child abuse and neglect.
  2. Describe the importance of promoting protective factors in families.
  3. Define Abusive Head Trauma and list the consequences experienced by victims.

Understanding Challenging Behaviors

Stephanie Eger and Amber Hauberg, MS

This session will explore the functions of challenging behavior and provide helpful strategies on how to address it in the classroom, home, and beyond. We will discuss setting limits, giving choices, positive guidance, and how the environment can affect behavior.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define the ABC’s and functions of behavior.
  2. Describe developmentally appropriate behaviors in early childhood development.
  3. Summarize strategies how to minimize challenging behavior.

The Evolution of Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education: The Future is Bright!

Jennifer Kilgo, EdD

This session will highlight the major developments in the field of Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education (EI/ECSE) spearheaded by the Division for Early Childhood (DEC). Knowledge of these national initiatives and priorities can assist professionals and families as they engage in policy and advocacy work focused on positively influencing the provision of equitable, high quality learning and development opportunities for each infant and young child eligible for EI/ECSE.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Identify Recommended Practices in Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education (EI/ECSE).
  2. Explain the EI/ECSE Standards and the importance to the field.
  3. Identify resources available in the field of EI/ECSE.
  4. Describe current initiatives and future directions of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC).

Loose Parts and Literacy: Let’s Get Busy

Sara Nance, Kelsey McFadden, Angela Parham, and Andi Gillen

This session will provide attendees with the opportunity to engage in play that supports invention, divergent thinking, problem solving and offers a sense of wonder for children. Using easily collectable household items, natural resources, and other supplies, participants will learn how easy it is to connect “loose parts play” to literature and promote learning in their early childhood or preschool classroom. Embedding goals for children with special needs will also be addressed.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define the term “loose parts” as it is related to play.
  2. Describe the benefits of incorporating loose parts play into the classroom and home environment.
  3. Demonstrate practical ways to utilize loose parts when providing therapy services by engaging with loose parts materials.
  4. List potential sources for loose parts within their community and/or home environments by collaborating with other professionals in the session to ensure information learned in workshop can be carried over in their workplace.

Parent Coaching of Infant Massage to Promote Bonding and Infant Development

Mary Beth Moses, PT, MS, NTMTC; Holley Steele, PT, MS, NTMTC; Mary Laura Day, MS, OTR/L, NTMTC; and Rebecca Osborne, MS, OTR/L, NTMTC

This session will describe how our early intervention team incorporates parent-led infant massage to facilitate parent/infant bonding. We will demonstrate how parents are coached and educated on handling and positioning to promote infant regulation, movement, and development.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the impact of negative touch and sensory experiences from the NICU and effects on an infant’s development.
  2. Describe difficulties experienced by caregivers of infants with NICU stays and medically complex infants.
  3. Identify strategies to help families promote positive touch experiences between caregiver and infants.
  4. Summarize how therapeutic positioning can be used to promote infant regulation and development.

Alabama State Department of Education Preschool Updates

Stephanie Frucci Bear, EdS, MS, CCC-SLP and Kathy Wilkins, MEd

This presentation will share the most recent information from the State Department of Education on various topics. The information provided will focus on updates related to preschool students with disabilities for preschool special education service providers, Speech-Language Pathologists, and administrators. Other topics that will be discussed include: new preschool standards, Indicator 7, IEP development, eligibility considerations, Preschool Outcomes, Early Intervention to preschool transition, monitoring, and more!

Participants will be able to:

  1. Summarize changes to policies and procedures for preschool students with disabilities in Alabama’s public schools.
  2. Identify the data sources and explain the significance of the preschool-related Annual Performance Report Indicators.
  3. Identify common areas of non-compliance in preschool special education.
12:00-1:30                  Lunch

1:30-3:00                    Breakout Sessions-Renaissance Riverview Hotel

Basics of Genetics

Melissa White, PT, MS and Devin Darwin, PT, DPT

This session will provide a basic understanding of genetics including why/when/how to test and what it looks like for a family going through this process.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Summarize the fundamentals of genetics and how it pertains to the testing that children in Early Intervention may undergo.
  2. Describe several types of genetic testing and the timeline when they may occur.
  3. Summarize some common (and not so common) genetic syndromes based on their chromosomal location.
  4. Describe basic terminology that is used in genetics.

Get Your Baby…Time to Play

Amy Brakenhoff

Moments of Connection are enormously important for each of us.  Capturing and reliving those moments encourages the connection to come alive time and time again. Learn how to foster those moments of connection with Baby Doll Circle Time in your classroom so children can relive the precious moments of connection with you over and over again. 

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the attachment styles available.
  2. Define the term “secondary caregiver”.
  3. Identify a secondary caregiver for each child in their classroom.
  4. List the 5 steps to “Baby Doll Circle Time”.

Safety in the Field

Johnny Lee

This session will provide simple, direct tips and habits to promote the safety for all of those who work in Early Intervention, home visitation, and child care settings. Topics include: safety for home/daycare visiting; preparation; getting there; being there; leaving; reporting red flags and precautions; what to look for in and out of the home; high risk situations; and how to recognize and communicate with a domestic violence victim and refer and support them. NOTE: The same session will be presented on both Monday and Tuesday so additional participants can attend.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Summarize how to prepare for an off-site visit to reduce safety risks.
  2. Describe how to travel with increased security awareness.
  3. Identify warning signs at the site location and position yourself for maximum safety.
  4. Describe how to leave home or daycare visits safely.
  5. List how to document safety concerns.

Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) and Early Intervention: Getting Started

Morgan Mayfield, MA, CCC-SLP

What is Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC)? Could AAC benefit children under three years of age? If so, when and how do I get started? These questions and more will be discussed in this introductory session about AAC and Early Intervention. Participants will learn about the different types of AAC available, and how those can support language and communication. The course will discuss common myths and parental concerns surrounding AAC in the birth to three population. Strategies and resources will be provided to help Early Interventionists support parents in considering and using AAC options.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the different types of AAC used in Early Intervention.
  2. Summarize three common concerns regarding AAC and Early Intervention.
  3. Identify three resources to support AAC in Early Intervention.

Words that Move Me

Melody Brown, EdS

Words have the power to move and create the world for our children with visual impairments. This session will educate attendees about the terms for low vision students and their families that will facilitate movement. Join this fun Orientation and Mobility based session. Parents and professionals will grow in their understanding of how descriptive language can augment students’ cognitive abilities. Side-by-side through play and practice you’ll grow in understanding the importance of directional language to get students to move their bodies and to move through their world.  We will start with comparative descriptions, orientation to the self, and orientation to an area or object. In this session you will have the opportunity to practice, play, make and take resources to make your little one move.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Explain how to access to an Alabama Institute of the Deaf and Blind (AIDB) Outreach Services application.
  2. Describe a list of useful directions that can be used with low vision students.
  3. Describe a list useful textually descriptive terms.
  4. Demonstrate the list of directionally and tactually useful terms in a small and large group activity.

Inclusion in a Pre-K Special Education Classroom-Why it Works!

Susanne Napp, MEd and Linda Check

Peer models are one of the greatest learning tools that can be utilized in a Pre-K special education classroom. They model appropriate behaviors, encourage appropriate language and social interactions, and foster friendships that span the course of their time in school. Inclusion, when done correctly, is mutually beneficial for all involved. A variety of videos from our classroom will be shown to demonstrate the effectiveness of true inclusion.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the goals of inclusion.
  2. Define the five goals of inclusion.
  3. Explain each of these element’s work to strengthen the effort to develop inclusion in schools and communities.
  4. Identify ways to promote inclusion in the classroom.
  5. Apply strategies to make a classroom more inclusive in order to make sure that all students are successful.
3:00-3:15                    Break and Exhibitors

3:15-4:45                    Breakout sessions-Renaissance Riverview Hotel

Boy Brains and Girl Brains: The Research Behind How They Differ

Joy Winchester

Is there a difference in boy brains and girl brains? Research suggests from in-utero the brain processes sounds differently. What does this research mean in practice when connecting with children, implementing strategies, or planning activities? Let’s explore the subtle differences and how to translate that into the relationship with the child.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the differences in how information is processed in the brains of male and female children.
  2. Identify strategies to support learning based on how information is processed.
  3. Summarize how our own preferences for learning is translated to the child we are working within the moment.

Using a Mental Health Lens in Home Visitation

Caroline May, LMFT

This workshop will be with a licensed therapist and home visiting program supervisor with sole focus of equipping home visitors and supervisors with practical tools and reflective practice skills to increase confidence and safety when working to support caregiver, infant, and early childhood mental health.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe a trauma-informed guide to approaching high-risk families within a non-clinical home visiting program.
  2. Summarize practical strategies for both parent educators and supervisors in identifying underlying mental health concerns, safety planning, and collaborating with local community mental health centers and private practice clinicians.
  3. Describe reflective strategies to ensure home visits are holding in mind a family’s trauma history, for the child, caregiver, and the home visitor.

 Beyond the Ashes of Burnout

Johence Smith, MS, Eds, LPC, NCC, IMH-E; Mandi Kessler, MA, LPC-S, ECMH-E; and Angela Hayes, LPC, NCC, ECMH-E                                 

This session will discuss personal experiences with burnout and the obstacles to getting help. We will also describe research-based techniques for preventing burnout for those working with parents and children in early childhood.

Participants will be able to:

  1. List the causes of burn out.
  2. Demonstrate using mindfulness activities that can help prevent burnout.
  3. Identify personal factors that put them at risk for burnout.
  4. Summarize how the trauma of their clients contributes to their burnout risk.
  5. Explain that burnout is a widespread experience shared by many.

Using American Sign Language (ASL) with Young Children Birth to 5 to Promote Early Language Acquisition

 Suzanne Mattox, EdS

This session will inform the audience on how learning American Sign Language (ASL) in early childhood benefits children’s brain development by promoting early visual communication. This session will also teach ASL vocabulary words and phrases from common daily routines such as mealtimes, bath time, playground time, circle time, etc. How to apply these signs in home and classroom settings will also be discussed.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the benefits of American Sign Language (ASL) for young deaf or hard of hearing children.
  2. Demonstrate at least 10 ASL vocabulary words and phrases from common daily routines to help families and teachers understand what it is like to learn and use ASL when communicating with children.
  3. Identify language milestones in deaf or hard of hearing children, age birth to five who use ASL.

From Information to Transformation: Offering Attuned Support using the Facilitating Attuned Interactions” (FAN) Framework

Beth Jones, MSW, IECMH-E; LaWana Kennedy, LPC, BC-TMH, ECMH-E; Dallas Rabig, LPC, IMH-E; and Sarah Ellen S. Thompson, MS

We are all hoping to empower those that we serve.  However, sometimes the struggle can be that we have lots of information but don’t see change.  Join us as we learn how Facilitating Attuned Interactions can help us move from just giving information to seeing long lasting transformation. Through this learning experience, participants will leave with practical ways to promote transformational change in their interactions with others.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the meaning of attuned support.
  2. Describe tools and knowledge to identify opportunities to attune to others.
  3. Summarize the Facilitating Attuned Interactions (FAN) framework and statewide efforts of implementation.

Cooperation Over Compliance: Achieving Greater Outcomes by Practicing Compassionate ABA

Jennifer Williams, MS, BCBA, LBA and Kristie Tullis, MA, BCBA, LBA

The field of Applied Behavior Analysis is evolving to place a strong emphasis on compassion and perspective-taking when designing behavioral interventions. This approach is more important than ever given the rise of mental health concerns in today’s children. This presentation will help participants make sound behavioral decisions while considering children’s mental and emotional well-being.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define compassionate care as it relates to the preschool setting.
  2. Describe the differences between cooperation and compliance.
  3. Summarize proactive strategies for promoting compassionate care and encouraging cooperation from staff and students.

Wednesday, October 19, 2022

8:00-9:15                    Breakout sessions-Renaissance Riverview Hotel

 

Play Pals: Encouraging Social Engagement and Learner Readiness in an Integrated Autism Preschool

Jennifer Baggett, MS, CCC-SLP; Angie Barber, PhD, CCC-SLP; Laci Watkins, PhD, LBA, BCBA; and Megan Fedewa, MA

Play Pals is an integrated collaborative preschool designed to build social engagement, communication, and learner readiness in children with Autism and typically developing peers. Using the SCERTS (Social Communication, Emotional Regulation and Transactional Support) Model as a framework, Play Pals emphasizes social communication, play, sensory activities, and pre-academic skills in a collaborative preschool environment where children with autism are fully integrated with typically developing children. This session will review the Play Pals model and suggest practical strategies and techniques for teachers and therapists to support children with autism in inclusive preschool programs.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Identify ways in which they can incorporate the SCERTS Model into an inclusive preschool setting.
  2. Assess practical ways to incorporate sensory strategies into their preschool setting.
  3. Describe how to arrange a classroom and a schedule to support peer interaction in the classroom.
  4. Apply different ways to support communication skills in an inclusive setting.

Transitioning from Early Intervention (Part C) to Preschool Services (Part B)

Sheila Bolling and Tabitha Perry, M.Ed.

This session will provide strategies to make transitioning from Early Intervention to Preschool as seamless as possible. This session will highlight the transition meetings, forms, read receipt, and other forms of communication.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Explain how to prepare the parent(s) for Transition from Early Intervention to preschool services.
  2. Describe the importance of a relationship and communication with the school system.
  3. Describe the Early Intervention Service Coordinator’s role at the 33rd-month meeting.
  4. Summarize how to facilitate smooth transitions and avoid common mistakes.

Tell Me a Story: Narrative Intervention for Preschoolers Who Are Deaf/Hard of Hearing

 Kameron Carden, MA, CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVEd

Young children who are deaf/hard of hearing (DHH) may present with average foundational listening and language abilities, but research shows they continue to remain at risk for developing complex language skills necessary for full access to academic and social contexts, such as story retelling. Narrative-based intervention has been shown to increase the length and complexity of story retelling across a variety of at-risk populations, including children with specific language impairment, language delays, and autism spectrum disorder, as well as children from culturally, linguistically, and economically diverse backgrounds. This session will describe the results of a single case study evaluating the effectiveness of a narrative intervention program with high feasibility on the expressive language skills of preschoolers who are DHH, as well as how to facilitate narrative development for all preschoolers with language delay.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the long-term effects of hearing loss on the development of complex language skills, particularly narrative generation.
  2. Explain why storytelling is critical for full participation in social and academic contexts.
  3. Analyze the effects of a caregiver-supported, multi-tiered narrative intervention program on the expressive language skills of preschoolers who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (D/HH).
  4. Describe evidence-based strategies for developing story retelling and narrative generation skills in preschoolers who are D/HH.

Leadership Essentials for Life-Long Success

 Arturo Menefee, PhD

The word “essential” is defined as necessary or extremely important. Therefore, essential skills are necessary or extremely important for someone to be successful at a specific job or task. Leaders from various backgrounds understand the importance of developing their leadership skills for professional and personal success. In this engaging and immersive session, Dr. Menefee will discuss the skills of successful leaders and provide clear examples of how one can enhance his/her leadership success. This session will assist participants with developing a variety of leadership, communication, and interpersonal skills necessary to maximize their success in the workplace and in life.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe effective leadership skills.
  2. Identify and describe the personal qualities and skills that contribute to successful leadership.
  3. Describe the importance of team building.
  4. Encourage and appreciate the diversity of a team.
  5. Identify important strategies/tools to improve one’s leadership abilities.

But That’s How It’s Always Been Done: Breaking Generational Practices Around Positive Guidance and Discipline

Tiffany Simon, MA

Times have changed. Best practices have changed. But positive guidance and discipline in childcare settings and even the home still look a lot like how our grandparents did it. This session will discuss positive guidance and discipline through the scope of breaking learned behaviors and providing what is best for rapidly-developing brains.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the difference between socialization, guidance, and discipline.
  2. Identify the meta-theories of child rearing and explain how they influence our interactions and expectations of young children.
  3. Summarize the five possible causes of behavior.
  4. Identify the effect our own life experiences have on current practices around socialization, guidance, and discipline.

 Why is the World Like a Rock Concert?

 Kristie Hamby, IMH-E and Tiffany Hill, MEd

This sensory training includes simulating an environment that has too much sensory input and how to help children navigate the environment. This training will also focus on what parents would like providers to know about their children and what struggles they face navigating the education world.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe how sensory overload load and feels.
  2. Summarize strategies for sensory overload.
  3. Explain how to be proactive for sensory issues.
  4. List where supports can be ordered.
9:15-9:45                    Break and Hotel Check out

9:45-11:00                  Breakout Sessions-Renaissance Riverview Hotel

 

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) in the Preschool Classroom

 Denise Dasinger, EdS; Audrey Rhoades; and Candace Wood, MA

This session will discuss the development of our Applied Behavior Analysis(ABA) focused preschool classrooms in Etowah County, Alabama. We will discuss training modules, classroom setup, and student success stories. This session will provide a new way to look at the preschool classroom through strategies that benefit both special needs and typical peers.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the use of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) in a preschool classroom.
  2. Explain the setup of an ABA classroom.
  3. Describe the use of Registered Behavior Technicians (RBTs) in a preschool classroom.

 Evaluations in Alabama’s Early Intervention System: Info, Tips, and Strategies

 Wendy Pittard and Brandi Brown, MS

This session will discuss the Alabama Early Intervention requirements for eligibility evaluations (five-part evaluations and domain-specific evaluations), specific evaluations that can be used to determine eligibility, the differences between norm-referenced and criterion-referenced tests, and why evaluations are important. We will also discuss parent report versus child-observed skills; strategies to use before, during, and after evaluations; how to share results with families; and what the next steps are after evaluation.

Participants will be able to:

  1. List the four Alabama Early Intervention System approved 5-part developmental evaluations and explain the differences between them.
  2. Explain how and when to adjust for prematurity.
  3. Summarize strategies to use during the evaluation such as how to begin the evaluation, how to phrase questions, and how/when to include parent report versus direct assessment or observation.
  4. Demonstrate how to score each protocol and provide results to the family.
  5. Describe essential elements of the evaluation report.

Identifying Key Components of State Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) Systems: Improving Opportunities for Deaf or Hard of Hearing (DHH) Children’s Early Language Acquisition

 Debra Trapani, EdS and Lori Lutz, PhD

The Southeast Regional Early Acquisition of Language (REAL) project is a federally-funded collaboration between the Clerc Center at Gallaudet University and Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind (AIDB) with the goal to optimize language acquisition for children who are deaf or hard of hearing from birth to age three. This session will describe the REAL project, which was established to provide support, training, and resources to the nine states through Alabama’s established infrastructure for information sharing and training at AIDB. The purpose of the Southeast REAL project is to develop partnerships with nine southeast states to better address each state’s unique needs.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the important role different groups of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) professionals and parents/caregivers play in the early language acquisition of young children who are deaf or hard of hearing.
  2. List the models of state EHDI services provided for parents/caregivers of young children who are deaf or hard of hearing.
  3. Explain approaches for addressing system gaps to support EHDI professionals and parents/caregivers receiving services.

 Anxiety and Depression: It’s a Family Affair

 David Finn, EdD

This session will explore the effects of the COVID Pandemic and its impact on the developing fetus, their mothers and other family members. Implications for service delivery personnel and intervention strategies will be provided.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the current state of COVID infection in the United States and selected countries.
  2. Discuss the impact that maternal COVID infection during pregnancy may have on their developing child.
  3. Name three primary characteristics of Anxiety and Depression in Children and Adults.
  4. List three approaches or resources for helping young family members who may be experiencing anxiety and/or depression.

Moving Through the Schedule-Tackling Transitions During the Day

 Joy Winchester

Classroom schedules and appropriate lesson plans guide us through the school day, but transitions are numerous in the day and transitions that are not effective lead to stressed out teachers and kids. How do you proactively plan transitions so you can move through your schedule? What “back-up” plans do you have if your plans go rogue? How do we effectively differentiate transition strategies for all children and all levels in a classroom? Hopefully we will answer those questions and you will create your own transition toolkit for your situation.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe transition strategies that would be flexible to meet multiple needs of children.
  2. Identify elements of effective transitions for all children.
  3. Apply strategies to create an action plan for their classrooms based on transition needs.

Introduction to Functional Vision Assessment

Anna Peters, MEd, NBCT

This session will introduce the term functional vision and describe the Functional Vision Assessment used to identify interventions and accommodations to encourage the development of visual skills in young children with visual impairment.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define functional vision.
  2. Explain the purpose of a Functional Vision Assessment.
  3. Identify appropriate interventions and accommodations to encourage the development of visual skills.
11:00-11:30                Break

11:30-12:30                Closing Keynote-Mobile Convention Center West Ballroom

 

Keynote: The Power of Emotional Intelligence: What It is and How to Succeed With It

Arturo Menefee, PhD

Do you want to understand yourself and others better? Do you know how your emotions not only affect you, but other people as well? Emotional Intelligence is not simply about feelings or just being in a good mood. It is about behaviors and choices. It is about your decisions. In this immersive and engaging presentation, you will learn how to harness your emotions and monitor their impact on your environment and your performance. You will also learn how to regulate stress and the benefits of an optimistic mindset. Emotional intelligence will help you to achieve amazing results in your profession and in your life!

Participants will be able to:

  1. Identify emotions and describe how they affect you and impact others.
  2. Explain how emotions enhance or limit success.
  3. Describe the importance of regulating stress for the benefit of your success.
  4. Apply emotional intelligence skills in the workplace and in  life.
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